About

Students

  • Colleen Carr

    Colleen is an advanced doctoral student in the clinical psychology program working under the mentorship of Dr. Sharlene Wolchik.  Colleen earned her bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Georgetown University in 2007.  After college, Colleen conducted government grant and contract-funded research in public and mental health in the Washington, D.C. area.  With a strong appreciation for the interplay of science and practice, Colleen began her graduate education at ASU in 2010, earning her M.A. in Psychology in 2013.  Colleen worked for several years on the New Beginnings Program and related Multicourt implementation grant and was involved with research related to parenting after divorce.  Her research has addressed post-divorce parenting and youth’s romantic outcomes and the interplay between romantic relationships and involvement in risky behavior.  Colleen enjoys applying research findings to clinical practice and has provided individual and group therapy to children, families, and adults through ASU’s Clinical Psychology Center.

  • Charlie Champion

    Charlie is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program working under the mentorship of Dr. Dishion in the Relationship Dynamics Lab. Her research interests lie in romantic relationships and investigating how partners influence one another. Specifically, she is interested in how romantic partners' EEG and other physiological data are linked (i.e. dyadic synchronicity). She is also interested in how relationship dynamics influence individual psychopathology and vice versa. Overall, she hopes to work towards the development of new and innovative therapies and interventions for romantic partners. 

  • Amanda Chiapa

    Amanda is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program and is co-mentored by Drs. Thomas Dishion and Armando Piña.  She is interested in the development, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based interventions aimed at reducing mental health problems (particularly anxiety and its comorbid problems) in children and adolescents across settings (e.g., hospitals, schools).  Amanda was awarded an American Psychological Association-Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Fellowship to pursue her interests in ensuring the identification and dissemination of culturally sensitive interventions towards underserved populations, including ethnic minority children and families. 

  • Sierra Clifford

    Sierra is a doctoral student in the developmental psychology program and an NIMH T32 pre-doctoral fellow at the ASU REACH Institute. Her research is broadly focused on children's temperament and the role of individual differences and gene-environment interplay (interaction and correlation) in risk for and resilience against psychopathology, and in particular the development of internalizing problems (depression and anxiety). She received a M.A. in Psychology in 2013, and is currently working with Dr. Kathryn Lemery-Chalfant on the Arizona Twin Project, a longitudinal twin study aimed at understanding the role of genetic influences and the early environment in the development of children's physical and mental health.

  • Heather Gunn

    Heather is a doctoral student in the quantitative psychology program. She earned her bachelors degree in Psychology from Texas Tech University in 2011. She is currently working as a research assistant for Dr. Jenn-Yun Tein on three different projects: Family Bereavement, New Beginnings, and La Familia. Her quantitative research interests include measurement invariance, multilevel modeling, and item response theory. Additionally, her substantive interests lie in the education and health fields. Heather is currently studying with Dr. Kevin Grimm.

  • Lindsay Holly

    Lindsay is an advanced doctoral student in the clinical psychology program and an NIMH T32 pre-doctoral fellow at the ASU REACH Institute. Lindsay is broadly interested in the cultural and contextual factors that influence the development and treatment of internalizing problems in children. She is developing her expertise in the role of family processes (e.g., parenting) in the developmental pathways that lead to anxiety in children and how these processes may inform child and family intervention strategies aimed at preventing anxious emotions and related maladaptive behaviors.

  • Julia Humphrey

    Julia is a doctoral student in the developmental psychology program, and works under the mentorship of Dr. Armando Pina. Julia’s primary research objectives are to elucidate socioemotional elements that influence the development and trajectory of anxiety disorders in culturally diverse youth. She is specifically interested in the contribution of social competence, friendship quality, and peer variables to anxiety, as well as the relative contribution of these variables across development. Julia also is interested in applying findings from her primary research objectives toward informing innovative community-based prevention programs for anxious children and adolescents.

  • Alex Ingram

    Alex is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program working with Dr. Sharlene Wolchik. Currently, she studies risk factors and interventions to promote resilience in children who face difficult family transitions such as parental bereavement and divorce. 

  • Emily Jenchura

    Emily is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program. She received a BS in Cross-Cultural Psychology from the University of Richmond in 2004. She then earned a Fulbright Scholarship to do research on social relations in Trinidad & Tobago, and worked as an English teacher in Guatemala. Following her international experiences, she worked as a Research Project Manager for the Veteran’s Affairs in Palo Alto. Emily currently works with Dr. Nancy Gonzales on the La Familia project looking at trajectories of stress and social support on adjustment among Mexican American youth. She also received a National Science Fellowship to pursue her research interests in stress and coping processes among minority youth. In her free time, Emily enjoys tap dancing and salsa, rock climbing, and hiking the beautiful AZ landscape.

  • Michaeline Jensen

    Michaeline is an advanced doctoral student in the clinical psychology program. She was a 2013-2014 NIMH T32 pre-doctoral fellow at the ASU REACH Institute and is currently working as a Graduate Research Assistant on Proyecto La Familia, and completing her dissertation utilizing data from Dr. Laurie Chassin's Adult and Family Development Project. Michaeline has also been extensively involved in Dr. Nancy Gonzales's research on the efficacy of the Bridges to High School intervention with middle school students and their caregivers. Her primary research focuses on understanding how cultural and contextual factors influence the development of adolescent substance use and risk taking behaviors.

  • Hanjoe Kim

    Hanjoe is a doctoral student in the quantitative psychology program. He received a BS in Psychology from the Catholic University of Korea and earned his MS in Quantitative Psychology from the SungKyunKwan University. He has been working as a research assistant for Dr. Tom Dishion from 2011 to 2014 doing data analyses on the Early Steps, Project Alliance 1, and ECOFit projects. Currently he is working with Dr. Jenn-Yun Tein on three projects (Family Bereavement, New Beginnings, and La Familia). Hanjoe is interested in multivariate statistical models including survival analysis, SEM, growth mixture models, and CACE modeling. Also, he is interested in measurement issues such as measurement invariance. Hanjoe enjoys playing drums and going to musical concerts.

  • Meghan M. Lally

    Meghan is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program. Her primary research interests include the development and evaluation of culturally grounded preventive interventions aimed at reducing health disparities among Hispanic and other ethnic minority adolescents. During her graduate training, she has been involved with two family-focused preventive interventions developed for Hispanic families in the Southwest: Bridges to High School/Puentes a la Secundaria (Dr. Nancy Gonzales) and Families Preparing the New Generation/Familias Preparando la Nueva Generación (Dr. Felipe Castro). Meghan is also a fellow of the National Hispanic Science Network’s (NHSN) Interdisciplinary Research Training Institute (IRTI) on Hispanic Drug Abuse and has served as a Co-Editor for the NHSN newsletter, El Faro: La Voz de la Red.

  • Andre Mansion

    Andre is an advanced doctoral student in the clinical psychology program, as well as a student of law at the Sandra Day O'Connor School of Law at ASU. He graduated with distinction from Duke University in 2008 with a B.A. in psychology. Andre works with Dr. Laurie Chassin on the Pathways to Desistance Project, a study of serious juvenile offenders. Broadly, his interests are in substance use and mental health disorders, sexual orientation, and race/ethnicity, specifically as they relate to juvenile delinquency and adolescent offenders. Andre hopes to integrate his legal training with his clinical training to influence policymaking pertaining to prevention and intervention efforts in the juvenile justice system. 

  • Gina Mazza

    Gina is a doctoral student in the quantitative psychology program working with Dr. Craig Enders. Her research focuses on missing data analysis and multilevel modeling. She is also interested in the application of advanced quantitative methods to research questions related to health and mental health. As part of the REACH Institute, Gina works under the direction of Dr. Jenn-Yun Tein on the Family Bereavement Project, Multi-Court Trial of the New Beginnings Program, and La Familia. Gina received a B.S. in Psychology and a minor in Mathematics from Arizona State University in 2012.

  • Kyle Menary

    Kyle is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program and an NIMH T32 pre-doctoral fellow at the ASU REACH Institute.  He received his B.A. in Psychology from the University of Minnesota in 2010 and his M.A. in Psychology from ASU in 2014.  Kyle is interested in investigating the neurobiological and behavioral mechanisms underlying the development of co-occurring internalizing disorders and alcohol use disorders.  Specifically, he is interested in investigating how alcohol use might be particularly negatively reinforcing among individuals with internalizing symptoms in terms of both subjective experience and physiological response to alcohol.  Kyle currently works with Dr. William Corbin in the Behavioral Alcohol Research for Clinical Advancement (BARCA) laboratory at ASU. 

  • Zorash Montaño

    Zorash is an advanced doctoral student in the clinical psychology program. She is interested in how family dynamics and parenting impact children’s mental and physical health. During her time in graduate school she has worked with Dr. Nancy Gonzales on Bridges to High School/Puentes a la Secundaria and with Dr. Thomas Dishion on delivering the Family Check-Up at Phoenix Children’s Hospital and on the Early Steps project. She is also interested in the adaptation of family-based interventions for culturally diverse groups and for real-world settings. She is passionate about working with ethnic minority populations, particularly Latinos, and understanding how to better serve these groups. She spent the summer of 2011 in Puebla, Mexico as a fellow in the Mental Health & Health Disparities International Research Training Program examining the outcomes of a cultural sensitivity training program for therapists. Most recently, Zorash was awarded the multi-year (2013-2016) American Psychological Association-Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Fellowship.

  • Chung Jung Mun

    Chung Jung (Moon) is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program. He received his B.A. from Waseda University in Japan and his M.A. from Arizona State University. He is currently working with Dr. Thomas Dishion as an advanced data analyst on family-based intervention studies, such as Early Steps and Project Alliance 1. Moon is particularly interested in examining the impact of substance use/abuse on various health-related outcomes. He is also interested in advanced statistical models such as SEM, multi-level modeling, growth mixture modeling, and CACE modeling.  

  • Brandon Nichter

    Brandon is a doctoral student and National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow in the clinical psychology program working under the auspices of Dr. Laurie Chassin and Dr. Nancy Gonzales. Brandon is currently involved in research with both the La Familia and Pathways to Desistance projects. Brandon earned his bachelor's degree in Psychology with distinction from Lewis & Clark College and his M.A. in Clinical Psychology from ASU in 2014. Prior to conducting his graduate work, Brandon was a Fulbright Scholar in Chile, where he conducted research on depression and substance use among adolescents at the University of Chile, School of Medicine. More recently, Brandon spent two years as an IRTA fellow at the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Broadly, his research interests include psychiatric epidemiology, developmental psychopathology, substance use, and cross-cultural health behavior.

  • Kaitlyn Panza

    Kaitlyn is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program working with Dr. Thomas Dishion on the Family Check-Up, as well as in the Relationship Dynamics Lab. She is interested in the underlying relationship dynamics (family, peer, and romantic relationships) that contribute to the development and maintenance of psychopathology. Ultimately, her goal is to help better understand the nuances of relationship dynamics as a way to develop and inform prevention and intervention programs. Prior to joining the REACH institute she completed her undergraduate career at Wellesley College and did intervention research with children and families at the Yale Child Study Center.   

  • William Pelham

    As a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program, working with Dr. Dishion, Will is interested in the development, testing, and optimization of interventions, particularly for externalizing problems. His current project involves examining a large trial of an early childhood family-based intervention (Early Steps) to determine what characterized those families that did not engage in treatment, as well as what characterized those that engaged, but did not respond. Will graduated from Dartmouth University in 2014 with a B.A. in psychology. 

  • Jenna Rudo-Stern

    Jenna, who works with Dr. Dishion on projects related to the ASU REACH Institute in general and the Family Check-Up in particular, is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program. She graduated in 2004 from Wellesley College with a B.A. in Russian and minor in economics. Before coming to ASU, she worked as a puppeteer, teacher, psychometrist, and study coordinator, steadily developing her skills and interest in interventions for children and families. Her current work focuses on the relationship between the family environment, child health behaviors, and child health status.

  • Mike Sladek

    Mike, who works on the ASSIST Study, graduated from Northwestern University in Evanston, IL, in 2013 with a B.A. in psychology and minors in political science and Spanish. Under Dr. Leah Doane's mentorship, Mike studies how daily life stress during the transition to college relates to adjustment, health, and well-being, particularly for ethnic minority and otherwise underrepresented college students. His master's thesis focuses on daily diary reports of everyday stress and self-regulatory (i.e., coping) processes as they relate to cortisol reactivity in first-year college students' naturalistic settings. Mike is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow who is also working to examine cultural resources among Latino youth that may promote successful transitions into the college environment.

  • Ariel Sternberg

    Ariel is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program working with Dr. Laurie Chassin on the Adult and Family Development Project. Her main interests are the etiology and development of substance use disorders, focusing on the risk pathways that lead to the development of disorder and how these pathways could inform effective prevention strategies. Prior to her work as a graduate student, she completed her B.S. at the University of Maryland and worked as a research coordinator on an adolescent residential unit at McLean Hospital in Belmont, MA.

  • Ryan Stoll

    Ryan is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program and works with Drs. Armando Piña and Nancy Gonzales on their projects of REACH for Personal and Academic Success and Bridges to High School. Ryan is interested in pinpointing the mechanisms underlying changes in treatment and prevention programs that target emotional and behavioral problems in youth. Through this, he hopes to identify ways to strengthen interventions and isolate dissemination and implementation factors that can improve the translation of these programs into sustainable tools and infrastructures for community stakeholders. Ryan is also currently integrating his scientific interests with his background and expertise in visual communication, marketing, and technology to assist with the development of the next-generation of community-based interventions. 

  • Reagan Styles

    Reagan Styles is a doctoral student in the developmental psychology program, currently working on the ASSIST Study. She graduated from Wofford College in Spartanburg, SC, in 2013 with a B.S. in psychology and a minor in sociology. Under the direction of her mentor, Dr. Leah Doane, Reagan is also involved in Dr. Doane’s Transition to College study, and is particularly interested in how sleep and may interact with and influence stress and emotional health (e.g. depression and anxiety), leading to individual differences in adjustment and well-being. Reagan is also involved in the Arizona Twin Project with Dr. Lemery-Chalfant and Dr. Doane, where she examines genetic and environmental influences on sleep, physiology, and adjustment during middle childhood. Her master’s thesis focuses on the association between familial factors, such as parenting and sibling conflict, and childhood sleep behavior, including the genetic and environmental influences on this relationship.

  • Scott Van Lenten

    Scott is a research assistant on the ASSIST study (PI: Leah Doane), a collaborative effort to better understand the challenges students face as they move from high school into the college environment. Scott’s primary research interests focus on the influence of everyday emotions and stressors on psychophysiological processes during adolescence and early adulthood. Scott’s masters thesis is on associations between sleep and diurnal patterns of physiological stress indices.

  • Frances Wang

    Frances is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program. She earned her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. She currently works with Dr. Laurie Chassin on her three-generational longitudinal study of familial alcoholism. Her interests mainly lie in the etiology and development of substance use/disorders, related externalizing problems, and heterotypic comorbidity. Frances was previously awarded a T32 pre-doctoral fellowship from the National Institute of Mental Health to receive training in prevention science. Her dissertation research is supported by a National Service Research Award Individual Pre-Doctoral Fellowship from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

  • Henry Wynne

    Henry Wynne is a graduate from Morehouse College (B.A.) and a NIH post-baccalaureate fellow from the University of Michigan. He is an advanced trainee in the clinical psychology doctoral program. He is developing his expertise with evaluating the cultural sensitivity of psychological scales and working with school-based preventive interventions aimed at reducing mental health problems (anxiety, depression). Henry’s scientific interests are in evaluating, developing, and implementing culturally robust preventive interventions aimed at targeting behavior problems and building resilience in ethnic minority youth. Henry is co-mentored by Drs. Armando Piña and Nancy Gonzales with their projects of REACH for Personal and Academic Success and Bridges to High School. Henry was awarded a multi-year (2012- 2015) American Psychological Association-Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Fellowship. The pre-doctoral fellowship will support Henry to develop expertise in behavioral health services and prevention science.