Research

Research

In addition to our work developing, evaluating, and disseminating evidence-based programs, the ASU REACH Institute also supports a number of exciting projects that focus more broadly on the science of intervention development, implementation, and evaluation. These research projects include investigating the risk and protective factors associated with child and family well-being, applying this research to develop treatment and prevention programs, studying factors that contribute to variation in program implementation and how implementation relates to outcomes, and identifying methods to increase participant engagement, provider efficacy, and quality of assessment related to these programs.

See a list of all currently or recently funded REACH grants.

Post-Doc/Pre-Doc Research Training in Drug Abuse/HIV Prevention: Closing the Research-Practice Gap

NIDA-funded T32 post-doctoral training program focusing on closing the research-practice gap in drug abuse and HIV prevention.Training is delivered through individually-tailored programs of coursework in drug abuse, HIV, and implementation science and mentored research experience. Trainees select multiple mentors from a large and multidisciplinary faculty whose work includes preventive interventions with children and families in settings including schools, health care, community mental health settings, and family courts. Emphases include implementation science for the adoption and sustainability of preventive interventions in natural service delivery settings, interventions for ethnically diverse populations, and quantitative methods in prevention science. Training is for a two-year period. We are currently accepting applications for Post-Doctoral positions starting in the Fall of 2015.

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The Parenting Young Children (PYC) Project

The Parenting Young Children Project aims to increase family engagement in an evidence-based prevention program by providing an engagement package, comprised of an informational flyer, testimonial booklet, teacher endorsement of the program (during a non-scripted interaction either in-person, by phone, or in writing), and an engagement call. The current study tests the effects of this engagement package when implemented under real-world conditions using a randomized, experimental, dismantling design to identify its effective component(s).

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La Familia – The Family Project

The Family Project (Proyecto La Familia) is a longitudinal study looking at the role of culture and context in the lives of 749 Mexican-origin families and is one of the largest and most representative longitudinal studies of this population to date. Data collection began when children were in the fifth grade and is now following them in the transition to young adulthood.

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REACH for Personal and Academic Success

This study examines factors responsible for the developmental course of health and illness in children and adolescents by using basic science approaches and developing interventions that test mechanisms implicated in child and family change.

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ASU Transition to College Study

This longitudinal study follows Arizona State University students from their senior year of high school through college using ecological momentary assessment techniques to collect salivary samples, gather objective and subjective sleep data, and measure social support and emotional health.

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ASSIST Study

The ASSIST study aims to develop an online parent-focused prevention program to support successful transitions to college. With this goal, the ASU REACH Institute, ASU Educational Outreach & Student Services, and the Department of Psychology are working together to gather diary data, conduct focus groups, administer questionnaires, and review academic records in order to identify the experiences and coping strategies that predict a positive college experience.

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The New Beginnings Program (NBP) Implementation Study

In conjunction with secondary data from the Multicourt Effectiveness Trial of the New Beginnings Program, investigators in this study are collecting observational data to explore aspects of implementation associated with participant engagement and participant outcomes. They are also examining how participant and provider characteristics relate to the quality of program implementation. Additionally, this study seeks to identify efficient implementation monitoring systems.

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Relationship Dynamics and Young Adult Drug Use and Abuse

The Relationship Dynamics study examines how alcohol use and drug use and abuse affect the formation and quality of young adult intimate relationships. Approximately 400 couples that cohabitate are interviewed, involved in videotaped interactions, and participate in momentary assessments for 1 year. The study will inform the design of the Relationship Check-up, and intervention design to support young adults’ navigation of complex issues of lifestyle and partner selection as they form families and long-term committed relationships.

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