About

Students

  • Colleen Carr

    Colleen is an advanced doctoral student in the clinical psychology program working under the mentorship of Dr. Sharlene Wolchik.  Colleen earned her bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Georgetown University in 2007.  After college, Colleen conducted government grant and contract-funded research in public and mental health in the Washington, D.C. area.  With a strong appreciation for the interplay of science and practice, Colleen began her graduate education at ASU in 2010, earning her M.A. in Psychology in 2013.  Colleen worked for several years on the New Beginnings Program and related Multicourt implementation grant and was involved with research related to parenting after divorce.  Her research has addressed post-divorce parenting and youth’s romantic outcomes and the interplay between romantic relationships and involvement in risky behavior.  Colleen enjoys applying research findings to clinical practice and has provided individual and group therapy to children, families, and adults through ASU’s Clinical Psychology Center.

  • Sierra Clifford

    Sierra is a doctoral student in the developmental psychology program and an NIMH T32 pre-doctoral fellow at the ASU REACH Institute. Her research is broadly focused on children's temperament and the role of individual differences and gene-environment interplay (interaction and correlation) in risk for and resilience against psychopathology, and in particular the development of internalizing problems (depression and anxiety). She received a M.A. in Psychology in 2013, and is currently working with Dr. Kathryn Lemery-Chalfant on the Arizona Twin Project, a longitudinal twin study aimed at understanding the role of genetic influences and the early environment in the development of children's physical and mental health.

  • Heather Gunn

    Heather is a doctoral student in the quantitative psychology program. She earned her bachelors degree in Psychology from Texas Tech University in 2011. She is currently working as a research assistant for Dr. Jenn-Yun Tein on three different projects: Family Bereavement, New Beginnings, and La Familia. Her quantitative research interests include measurement invariance, multilevel modeling, and item response theory. Additionally, her substantive interests lie in the education and health fields. Heather is currently studying with Dr. Kevin Grimm.

  • Alex Ingram

    Alex is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program working with Dr. Sharlene Wolchik. Currently, she studies risk factors and interventions to promote resilience in children who face difficult family transitions such as parental bereavement and divorce. 

  • Andre Mansion

    Andre is an advanced doctoral student in the clinical psychology program, as well as a student of law at the Sandra Day O'Connor School of Law at ASU. He graduated with distinction from Duke University in 2008 with a B.A. in psychology. Andre works with Dr. Laurie Chassin on the Pathways to Desistance Project, a study of serious juvenile offenders. Broadly, his interests are in substance use and mental health disorders, sexual orientation, and race/ethnicity, specifically as they relate to juvenile delinquency and adolescent offenders. Andre hopes to integrate his legal training with his clinical training to influence policymaking pertaining to prevention and intervention efforts in the juvenile justice system. 

  • Kyle Menary

    Kyle is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program and an NIMH T32 pre-doctoral fellow at the ASU REACH Institute.  He received his B.A. in Psychology from the University of Minnesota in 2010 and his M.A. in Psychology from ASU in 2014.  Kyle is interested in investigating the neurobiological and behavioral mechanisms underlying the development of co-occurring internalizing disorders and alcohol use disorders.  Specifically, he is interested in investigating how alcohol use might be particularly negatively reinforcing among individuals with internalizing symptoms in terms of both subjective experience and physiological response to alcohol.  Kyle currently works with Dr. William Corbin in the Behavioral Alcohol Research for Clinical Advancement (BARCA) laboratory at ASU. 

  • Brandon Nichter

    Brandon is a doctoral student and National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow in the clinical psychology program working under the auspices of Dr. Laurie Chassin and Dr. Nancy Gonzales. Brandon is currently involved in research with both the La Familia and Pathways to Desistance projects. Brandon earned his bachelor's degree in Psychology with distinction from Lewis & Clark College and his M.A. in Clinical Psychology from ASU in 2014. Prior to conducting his graduate work, Brandon was a Fulbright Scholar in Chile, where he conducted research on depression and substance use among adolescents at the University of Chile, School of Medicine. More recently, Brandon spent two years as an IRTA fellow at the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Broadly, his research interests include psychiatric epidemiology, developmental psychopathology, substance use, and cross-cultural health behavior.

  • Mike Sladek

    Mike, who works on the ASSIST Study, graduated from Northwestern University in Evanston, IL, in 2013 with a B.A. in psychology and minors in political science and Spanish. Under Dr. Leah Doane's mentorship, Mike studies how daily life stress during the transition to college relates to adjustment, health, and well-being, particularly for ethnic minority and otherwise underrepresented college students. His master's thesis focuses on daily diary reports of everyday stress and self-regulatory (i.e., coping) processes as they relate to cortisol reactivity in first-year college students' naturalistic settings. Mike is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow who is also working to examine cultural resources among Latino youth that may promote successful transitions into the college environment.

  • Ariel Sternberg

    Ariel is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program working with Dr. Laurie Chassin on the Adult and Family Development Project. Her main interests are the etiology and development of substance use disorders, focusing on the risk pathways that lead to the development of disorder and how these pathways could inform effective prevention strategies. Prior to her work as a graduate student, she completed her B.S. at the University of Maryland and worked as a research coordinator on an adolescent residential unit at McLean Hospital in Belmont, MA.

  • Ryan Stoll

    Ryan is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program and works with Drs. Armando Piña and Nancy Gonzales on their projects of REACH for Personal and Academic Success and Bridges to High School. Ryan is interested in pinpointing the mechanisms underlying changes in treatment and prevention programs that target emotional and behavioral problems in youth. Through this, he hopes to identify ways to strengthen interventions and isolate dissemination and implementation factors that can improve the translation of these programs into sustainable tools and infrastructures for community stakeholders. Ryan is also currently integrating his scientific interests with his background and expertise in visual communication, marketing, and technology to assist with the development of the next-generation of community-based interventions. 

  • Reagan Styles

    Reagan Styles is a doctoral student in the developmental psychology program, currently working on the ASSIST Study. She graduated from Wofford College in Spartanburg, SC, in 2013 with a B.S. in psychology and a minor in sociology. Under the direction of her mentor, Dr. Leah Doane, Reagan is also involved in Dr. Doane’s Transition to College study, and is particularly interested in how sleep and may interact with and influence stress and emotional health (e.g. depression and anxiety), leading to individual differences in adjustment and well-being. Reagan is also involved in the Arizona Twin Project with Dr. Lemery-Chalfant and Dr. Doane, where she examines genetic and environmental influences on sleep, physiology, and adjustment during middle childhood. Her master’s thesis focuses on the association between familial factors, such as parenting and sibling conflict, and childhood sleep behavior, including the genetic and environmental influences on this relationship.

  • Scott Van Lenten

    Scott is a research assistant on the ASSIST study (PI: Leah Doane), a collaborative effort to better understand the challenges students face as they move from high school into the college environment. Scott’s primary research interests focus on the influence of everyday emotions and stressors on psychophysiological processes during adolescence and early adulthood. Scott’s masters thesis is on associations between sleep and diurnal patterns of physiological stress indices.

  • Frances Wang

    Frances is a doctoral student in the clinical psychology program. She earned her B.S. in Psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. She currently works with Dr. Laurie Chassin on her three-generational longitudinal study of familial alcoholism. Her interests mainly lie in the etiology and development of substance use/disorders, related externalizing problems, and heterotypic comorbidity. Frances was previously awarded a T32 pre-doctoral fellowship from the National Institute of Mental Health to receive training in prevention science. Her dissertation research is supported by a National Service Research Award Individual Pre-Doctoral Fellowship from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.